Category ArchiveRevolution

Libya Revolution 2011

Libya's Revolution 2011

Libya's Revolution 2011

What began in Tunisia is no longer containable, as revolution sweeps through the Middle East, challenging whatever government lies in its path — including that of Colonell Moammar Gadhafi, or the “mad dog,” as President Ronald Reagan once called him.

Protests in Libya erupted on February 15 following the arrest of Fathi Terbii, a human rights attorney who represented the “relatives of more than 1,000 prisoners allegedly massacred by security forces in Tripoli’s Abu Salim jail in 1996,” the BBC reported.

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Tunisia Revolution 2011

Tunisia Revolution 2011

Tunisia Revolution 2011

Tunisia swore in a new interim president on the 15 January 2011 while struggling to contain looting, deadly prison riots and chaos in the streets.

The unrest came after President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali was swept from power on Friday following a month of street protests over corruption, a lack of jobs and clampdowns on civil liberties.

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Egypt Revolution 2011

Egypt Revolution 2011

Egypt Revolution 2011

What’s Going On In Egypt?: Protests started on Tuesday, January 25, when — inspired by the successful revolution in Tunisia — thousands began taking to the streets to protest poverty, rampant unemployment, government corruption and autocratic governance of President Hosni Mubarak, who has ruled the country for 30 years. These were the first protests on such a large scale in Egypt since the 1970s.

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Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa on July 18, 1918. His father was Chief Henry Mandela of the Tembu Tribe. Mandela himself was educated at University College of Fort Hare and the University of Witwatersrand and qualified in law in 1942. He joined the African National Congress in 1944 and was engaged in resistance against the ruling National Party’s apartheid policies after 1948. He went on trial for treason in 1956-1961 and was acquitted in 1961.

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